The Reading List: Malcolm X’s Missing Pages Found, Writers Fight to Save Walt Whitman Brooklyn Home, and More Stories

The Reading List: Malcolm X’s Missing Pages Found, Writers Fight to Save Walt Whitman Brooklyn Home, and More Stories

Mystery Solved: An entire unpublished chapter and a series of unpublished pages from Malcolm X’s autobiography, long thought to be missing or lost, resurfaced this week from a private collector to be sold at auction at Guernsey’s in New York. The materials, which were deemed too controversial to publish in 1965, were acquired by the New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. The auction lot also included the original typed manuscript of the book, with notes between Malcolm X and his collaborator, Alex Haley. Guardian / New York Times  

Brooklyn Landmark: A group of writers and preservationists are fighting to save a deteriorating Brooklyn row house where Walt Whitman once resided. The group, known as the Coalition to Save Walt Whitman’s House, last year put in a request for landmark status to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, but the application was denied. The coalition, however, is not giving up — the group is now making a second attempt to protect the building. Gothamist

Gender Equality: Iceland Airwaves made good on a goal to have women represent at least half of the acts in its music festival, making it the first festival among 109 groups that signed on to the global initiative Keychange to do so. The initiative, created to address gender inequality at musical festivals, encourages organizations to achieve “gender balance” by 2022. The New York Times

Lost Archive: The house and personal archive of pioneering Greek film director Theo Angelopoulos were destroyed in the devastating wildfire outbreak in Greece. AFP

Hitmaker: We took an in-depth look at the Atlantic Theater Company and the group’s process in nurturing and producing off-Broadway shows that go on to great commercial success. ALL ARTS 

Real Talk: “Women must recognize what power we have and where — however small and dull it might feel — and use it to advocate on behalf of others for the betterment of us all.” Michelle Williams gives a rare interview to Vanity Fair, in which she opens up about love and equity. Vanity Fair