The Reading List: Jane Austen’s First Patron Revealed, Haruki Murakami’s Latest Novel Censored, and More Stories

The Reading List: Jane Austen’s First Patron Revealed, Haruki Murakami’s Latest Novel Censored, and More Stories

Loathsome Patron: A Ph.D student at the University of Pennsylvania has uncovered a twist in the life of Jane Austen: The first person to buy Austen’s debut novel, “Sense and Sensibility,” was none other than the Prince Regent — a man who Austen despised. The writer would later (begrudgingly) dedicate her fourth novel to the prince, who would go on to become George IV. The New Republic

Page Turner: After a Hong Kong tribunal declared it “indecent,” the latest novel by acclaimed author Haruki Murakami has been taken off some bookstore shelves and must now be wrapped with warning labels when sold in the region. Titled “Killing Commendatore,” the novel, which is about loneliness, has reinvigorated a debate about censorship in Hong Kong, with academics and government officials chiming in.  The Guardian

New Leadership: Following a nationwide search for new leadership, BRIC has named Kristina Newman-Scott as the organization’s next president. Newman-Scott will take the helm in September. Bklyner

Adaptations: HBO gave the green light to a film adaptation of “Deadwood,” its cancelled cult-favorite series about a coal-mining town in the post-Civil War years. In other movie news, Broadway hit “Hamilton” may be coming to a screen near you sometime in 2020. Variety / The Wall Street Journal

Trending: Will viral videos change the music industry? Billboard reporter Gil Kaufman takes a deep dive into meme culture in hopes of revealing its influence over artists and fans. Meanwhile, an exhibition at the Museum of the Moving Image in New York delves into similar territory through its focus on YouTube and the aesthetics of internet videos.  Billboard / ALL ARTS

Poetic Languages: Patricio Ferrari explores Argentinian-born poet Alejandra Pizarnik’s foreign language writings and finds major themes: “Written by hand on loose papers probably without publication in mind, these French texts explore many of Pizarnik’s deepest obsessions: the limitation of language, silence, the body, night, the nature of intimacy, madness, death.” The Paris Review

Top Image: Courtesy of Creative Commons