The Reading List: AIDS Activists Protest Whitney Museum Exhibition, Moviepass Tries to Reassure Subscribers, and More Stories

The Reading List: AIDS Activists Protest Whitney Museum Exhibition, Moviepass Tries to Reassure Subscribers, and More Stories

“AIDS Is Not History”: A group of ACT UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) New York activists held a demonstration at the Whitney Museum on Friday to protest the museum’s current David Wojnarowicz retrospective, “History Keeps Me Awake at Night.” The protestors argue that the show memorializes the HIV/AIDS epidemic rather than contextualizing it as an ongoing issue. “When we talk about HIV/AIDS without acknowledging that there’s still an epidemic including in the United States,” reads one demonstration flyer, “the crisis goes quietly on and people continue to die.” Artforum

Female Voice: Last year, NPR Music announced it was launching Turning the Tables, an ambitious project dedicated to increasing visibility and representation in the canon of popular music. As part of that effort, the music site and radio station on Monday released a curated list of the top 200 songs by women-identified artists. Superstars like Beyonce and Lady GaGa made the list, as did indie charmers like Courtney Barnett and Feist. The question is: Where did they rank? The answers might surprise you, and, if nothing else, they’ll certainly invite plenty of discussion. NPR

Movie Fail: After a series of major missteps over the past few days — including running out of money on Thursday, rendering its app useless — Moviepass is trying to reassure its customers that everything is under control. Gothamist

Underground Reads: Love old libraries? Archaeologists have uncovered the foundations of what they believe to be the oldest library in Germany. The Art Newspaper

Tragedy: The New York Times took an in-depth look at the suicide of actor Jeff Loeffelholz, an understudy in the Broadway production of “Chicago,” the repercussions of the tragic event, and the ways in which creative personnel in positions of authority wield power over actors and musicians on Broadway. New York Times

Top Image: Courtesy of Jon Seidman